A documentation of the aggressive arts. Written by Sawyer Paul.

Showing posts tagged nra

NRA’s School Security Plan Cites Phony Shooting

The centerpiece of the NRA-funded “Report of the National School Shield Task Force” is putting armed guards in America’s K-12 schools. Deep into the 225-page report, a section on securing buildings makes the case for doing away with classroom windows that may be vulnerable to armed attackers. It cites a mass murder from three years ago—except it never happened.

 Just when you think you’ve got the answers, I change the questions.

And make up a bunch of bullshit.​

Screenshots of reviews from the NRA Practice Range app. Lots of stars, but only because 1 star is still a star. If Apple can remove other apps for political motive, there’s no reason for this app to stay up for very long. Screenshots of reviews from the NRA Practice Range app. Lots of stars, but only because 1 star is still a star. If Apple can remove other apps for political motive, there’s no reason for this app to stay up for very long. Screenshots of reviews from the NRA Practice Range app. Lots of stars, but only because 1 star is still a star. If Apple can remove other apps for political motive, there’s no reason for this app to stay up for very long. Screenshots of reviews from the NRA Practice Range app. Lots of stars, but only because 1 star is still a star. If Apple can remove other apps for political motive, there’s no reason for this app to stay up for very long. Screenshots of reviews from the NRA Practice Range app. Lots of stars, but only because 1 star is still a star. If Apple can remove other apps for political motive, there’s no reason for this app to stay up for very long.

Screenshots of reviews from the NRA Practice Range app. Lots of stars, but only because 1 star is still a star. If Apple can remove other apps for political motive, there’s no reason for this app to stay up for very long.

The NRA's anti-Obama Ad Is Not Only Tasteless But Also Totally Unrealistic

Some people are calling the NRA’s new anti-Obama ad a thinly veiled threat against the president’s children. I doubt that this was its intent, but nonetheless, it’s well beyond poor taste to use Obama’s kids to make a point. (And it’s absurd on its face: Like Jenna and Barbara Bush before them, Sasha and Malia get protection at school, as do all US presidents’ children. It’s called the Secret Service.) Between this and the Shooting Range app recently released by the NRA on iOS devices, the lobbying group’s public-relations wing is failing miserably.

1) Not to mention the kerning. I was offended mostly by the kerning.

2) The Obama’s don’t have a choice in personal security. It comes with the gig, and I’m sure they hate it. There isn’t a single sane person in the world who enjoys their personal security, because they’re—by definition—less free.

3) This little detail was pushed a little under the lead, but the NRA has an Apple-approved app? Apple bans all sorts of offensive and politically controversial apps, but the NRA gets a pass?

The NRA Myth of Arming the Good Guys

A closer look reveals that their case for arming Americans against mass shooters is nothing more than a cynical ideological talking point—one dressed up in appeals to heroism and the defense of constitutional freedom, and wholly reliant on misdirection and half truths. If only Sandy Hook’s principal had been packing heat, the argument goes, she could’ve stopped the mass killer. There’s just one little problem with this: Not a single one of the 62 mass shootings we studied in our investigation has been stopped this way…

The problem with gun owners is unfortunately the same as the problem with religious extremists: no amount of evidence will ever get them to change their mind. We can read article after article, do study after study, and try our best to explain that “guns don’t kill people, but people with access to guns do,” but it doesn’t matter. They have faith in the gun, so of course more guns are the answer.

What does it feel like to be shot?

It’s too easy to fall down the rabbit hole of Reddit threads, but I got really lost in this one. The variety of locales and situations that people have been shot (and, thankfully, survived) is staggering. What also got to me were how many people used the thread as a joke, as a platform to make a zinger, and how easy it was to feel a canyon of sadness for a girl who had been shot by her boyfriend, and then segue to laughing about a Forrest Gump reference.

During the NRA press conference last week, (full transcript), Wayne LaPierre mentioned that various (ancient) media “portray life as a joke and murder as a way of life.” It’s the one sentence from the tone-deaf speach that resonated with me. I feel like making light of situations is a natural human coping mechanism. If this Reddit thread had no jokes in it and only serious accounts of near-fatal shootings, it would be a lot harder to get through. We can’t help but portray life as a joke. Doing it any other way is too painful to comprehend.

The Man Leading The NRA’s Push For Guns In Schools

Since then, he’s formed a consulting business, Hutchinson Group, and a law firm, The Asa Hutchinson Law Group, which is based in Arkansas but maintains a D.C. office. Among Hutchinson clients, past and present, listed on the Hutchinson Group’s website are Xe Services, the private security company previously known as Blackwater and now known as Academi. It also lists Science Applications International Corporation, or SAIC, a major federal contractor and a company which in March agreed to pay New York City $500 million for its role in a project that U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara called “corrupted to its core by one of the largest and most brazen frauds ever committed against the City of New York.”

Sounds like a real winner.

In a very different setting, a at a hearing on gun control legislation in May 1999, Hutchinson, then still in Congress, made a different argument.

His argument will make you smack your head against your desk.

Back then, shooting a bullet was only slightly faster than throwing one

The firearms used by a well-regulated militia, at the time the Second Amendment was written, were mostly long arms that, like a smaller stockpile of pistols, could discharge only once before they had to be reloaded. In size, speed, efficiency, capacity, and sleekness, the difference between an eighteenth-century musket and the gun that George Zimmerman was carrying is roughly the difference between the first laptop computer—which, not counting the external modem and the battery pack, weighed twenty-four pounds—and an iPhone.

The best thing written about America’s gun endemic was published last April in the New Yorker by Jill Lepore. The primary subject matter at the time was the shooting of Trayvon Martin, but the underlying theme is applicable to senseless shootings—which is to say, all shootings.